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Advocacy / FY2010 Agenda at a Glance 

HACU’s Legislative Agenda for the 1st Session of the 111th Congress

Executive Summary

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) is the nation’s champion of Hispanic higher education success. HACU is the only nationally recognized voice for Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), which serve the largest concentrations of Hispanic students in higher education in the United States.

HACU presents a Legislative Agenda for the 1st Session of the 111th Congress to address Hispanic higher education needs across the K-20 pipeline and beyond in a comprehensive way.

HACU’s Legislative Agenda addresses Hispanic higher education needs through appropriations requests for federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 and authorization recommendations for No Child Left Behind and a call for enactment of DREAM Act legislation.


HACU’s Appropriations Goals for FY 2010

Higher Education Act

Title V: Part A Undergraduate Education

  • HACU requests a Title V appropriation for undergraduate support for HSIs of $175 million for FY 2010.

Title V: Part B Graduate Education

  • HACU requests authorizing language and a first-time $100 million appropriation for graduate education support for HSIs under Title V for FY 2010.

Farm Bill – The  Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008

Title VII: Research, Extension and Teaching

  • HACU requests $40 million for the Title VII-HSI Grants Program
  • HACU requests $20 million for the HSACU Equity Grants Program
  • HACU requests $80 million for the Endowment Fund for Hispanic-Serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACUs)
  • HACU requests $40 million for the HSACU Institutional Capacity-Building Grant Program
  • HACU requests $40 million for the HSACU Fundamental and Applied Research Grants Program
  • HACU requests $40 million for the HSACU Extension Grants Programs

Title VIII: Forestry and Related Fields

  • HACU requests $40 million for the HSI Agricultural Land National Resources Leadership Program in forestry and related fields.

Other Federal Agency Appropriations

Department of Commerce:

  • HACU requests a U.S. Department of Commerce appropriation of $500 million for the Minority-Serving Institution Digital and Wireless Technology Opportunity Program for Hispanic-Serving Institutions and other minority serving institutions as defined by part B of the Higher Education Act for FY 2010.

Department of Energy:

  • HACU requests $150 million for FY 2010 for the Western Hemisphere Energy Cooperation Program and for HSI research programs as a part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA): 
    • $50 million for the Western Hemisphere Energy Cooperation (WHECP) program to promote cooperation on energy issues with countries of the Western Hemisphere
    • $100 million for a program for HSIs to carry out research in the bio-energy, fossil energy, renewable energy and other related areas as described in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) for Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy authorized under Section 5012 of the America COMPETES Act (42 U.S.C.)
  • HACU requests that Congress establish a fund for renewable energy research at HSIs through a competitive grant process to find new solutions to the energy crisis, global warming and environmental projection issues, the funding level to be set at $1 billion as a part of the ARRA of 2009 stimulus legislation.

Department of Defense:

  • HACU requests a U.S. Department of Defense appropriation for HSIs of $20 million for FY 2010:
    • $15 million for research development, testing and evaluation infrastructure support for HSIs
    • $5 million for faculty development programs for HSIs.

Department of Health and Human Services:

  • HACU requests a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services appropriation of $20 million for HSIs within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for faculty development, research and capacity building for FY 2010.

Department of Housing and Urban Development

  • HACU requests a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) appropriation of $12 million for FY 2010 for the Hispanic-Serving Institutions Assisting Communities (HSIAC) program to extend the reach of HUD programs into fast-growing Hispanic communities.
  • HACU requests a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) appropriation of $5 million for FY 2010 to reinstate the HUD Hispanic-Serving Institution Work-Study Program (HSI-WSP) to aid two-year HSIs.

National Science Foundation (NSF):

  • HACU requests a NSF appropriation of $30 million for a competitive grants program to strengthen HSI undergraduate STEM education. research, curriculum and infrastructure development, and for other purposes, for FY 2010 as authorized by the 2007 AmericaCOMPETES Act.

National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA):

  • HACU requests a NASA appropriation of $10 million to support a HACU/HSI consortium to elevate the model, regional pre-collegiate Proyecto Access initiative for science, technology, mathematics and engineering to a nationwide program for FY 2010.

Strengthening the K-College Pipeline

Title I (Elementary and Secondary Education Act – No Child Left Behind) Migrant Education Program:

  • HACU recommends a FY 2010 $450 million appropriation under Title I, Part C, of the ESEA for the Migrant Education Program.

Title IV (HEA) HEP-CAMP:

  • HACU recommends a FY 2009 $50 million appropriation for HEP-CAMP, under Title IV of the Higher Education Act (HEA): a $30 million appropriation for HEP and a $20 million appropriation for CAMP.

Title I (ESEA) Dropout Prevention:

  • HACU recommends a FY 2010 $45 million appropriation under Title I, Part H, of the ESEA for Dropout Prevention.

Title IV (HEA) GEAR UP:

  • HACU recommends a FY 2010 $350 million appropriation under Title IV of the HEA for GEAR UP for low-income youth.

Title IV (HEA) TRIO:

  • HACU recommends a FY 2010 $900 million appropriation for TRIO programs under Title IV of the HEA. 


HACU’s Authorization Public Policy Priorities Recommendations

No Child Left Behind (NCLB)/Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)

No Child Left Behind (NCLB) is the federal effort to assist states in improving the education performance and achievement of all students who attend K-12 public schools. NCLB is scheduled for reauthorization during the 111th Congress. A complete text of HACU’s 2007 NCLB/ESEA Policy Priorities can be obtained at the HACU Web site under HACU Policy Statements.  HACU’s NCLB policy agenda consists of thirteen recommendations under Tile I and Title II.

Title I:

  • Authorize a $20 million competitive grant program for HSIs to increase the number of culturally and linguistically competent early childhood education teachers and teaching assistants prepared to address the educational and developmental needs of Hispanics and English Language Learners (ELLs), including the ability to communicate effectively with their parents.
  • Authorize a $15 million competitive grant program for HSIs to provide professional development and expertise to teachers in HSSDs to expand the number of AP courses in STEM areas and to promote awareness of higher education options for high school students in the varied STEM areas.
  • Authorize a $20 million competitive grant program to support HSI/HSSD consortia to replicate the HACU-NASA pre-collegiate STEM program for middle and high school students. The program will prepare a legion of Hispanic students to pursue careers in STEM fields as well as for admission to HSIs and other colleges and universities.

Title II:

  • Authorize a competitive grant program of $50 million “and such sums as may be necessary” on an annual basis for HSIs to expand teacher education programs to train elementary, middle, and high school teachers to become culturally and linguistically prepared to address the needs of Hispanic students and English Language Learners.
  • Authorize a competitive grant program of $50 million “and such sums as may be necessary” on an annual basis for HSIs to develop culturally and linguistically prepared master teachers in core areas including STEM to teach at HSSDs.
  • Authorize a competitive grant program $20 million for HSIs to provide scholarships to Hispanic and other minority teachers who attend an HSI, receive a teaching certificate, and commit to teaching at an HSSD for no less than five years.
  • Authorize a loan forgiveness program of $10 million for students who attend an HSI, receive a teaching certificate and teach in an HSSD for no less than 5 years.
  • Authorize a competitive grant program of $25 million to increase the number of Hispanic faculty at HSIs conducting research to promote effective teaching strategies for Hispanics, English Language Learners and other minority students and to develop innovative school improvement models to increase high school graduation and college participation rates for Hispanics and other minority students attending HSSDs.
  • Authorize a competitive grant program of $20 million for HSIs to enhance and expand counseling programs to train culturally and linguistically prepared counselors to address the needs of Hispanics and English Language Learners in K-12 education and expose students to college opportunities and career options.   
  • Authorize a competitive grant program of $10 million for HSIs to enhance teacher education programs in STEM areas to increase the number of STEM teachers at HSSDs.
  • Authorize a competitive grant program of $20 million for HSIs located in border states and in states with high Hispanic populations to retrain certified teachers from Mexico and other Latin American countries with high levels of immigration, to teach in U.S. schools in California, Arizona, Texas, Louisiana, New York, Illinois, and other areas to address the shortage of highly qualified teachers.
  • Authorize $20 million to establish an Educational Leadership Institute to train principals, superintendents, and other high level school officials for positions at the growing number of HSSDs.
  • Authorize a competitive grant program of $20 million for HSIs to train school principals with instructional leadership skills and cultural competency to serve the growing number of HSSDs.

DREAM Act (Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors)

In the 107th, 108th, 109th and 110th sessions of Congress, DREAM Act legislation has been introduced to provide a 6-year path to legal status after high school for over 65,000 undocumented immigrant students who would attend college for two years or serve in the military for two years. While DREAM Act initiatives have not yet been successful, HACU continues to support and advocate for legislation that would provide higher education access and a path to citizenship for academically exemplary undocumented immigrant students.

  • Enact the DREAM Act (or amend the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 with the inclusion of the DREAM Act) to permit states to determine state residency for higher education purposes and to authorize the cancellation of removal and adjustment of status of certain alien students who are long-term United States residents.

Minority Health Disparities Legislation

Compelling evidence both from demographic sources and from health care centers indicates that race and ethnicity correlate with persistent, and often increasing, health disparities that demand national attention. Despite notable progress in the overall health of the nation, there are continuing disparities in the burden of illness and death experienced by Hispanics and other minority populations compared to the U.S. population as a whole. 

HACU will develop a “Minority Health Disparities Policy Document” with a focus on Hispanic health disparities, health care workforce development, disease and illness directed research and health care outreach to minority communities for recommendation to the 111th Congress.

HSI Workforce Investment Act - Policy Statement

The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 (Public Law 105-220) was signed into law on Aug. 7, 1998 and was scheduled to be reauthorized in 2003. However, the WIA was not reauthorized in either the 109th and 110th Congress. 

More than 50% of Hispanic-Serving Institutions are community colleges, are located in high density urban areas and can play a significant role in training new workers for the changing industrial and manufacturing demands of the nation. HSI community colleges serve populations with maximum growth potential fueled by a young Hispanic population and continued immigration from Latin America and Caribbean nations.

HACU will develop a policy position on the role of HSIs in the reauthorization of the Workforce Investment Act. The WIA HACU Policy Document will be transmitted to both chambers of Congress and to the Administration prior to their deliberations on reauthorization for recommendation to the 111th Congress.

HACU’s Legislative Agenda presents appropriations targets and authorization recommendations essential to assuring a bright future, not only for Hispanics but for all Americans.